Sunday, 8:00 AM – 8:30 AM: Registration

Sunday, 8:30 AM – 11:30 AM (3 CEUs)

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Intermediate
  • Practice Settings: acute care, subacute rehabilitation
  • Downloads:

Session Description:

Occupational therapists have a vital role in addressing cognitive changes in the acute care and step down settings (IPR, SAR, SNF). When cognitive level or abilities is not incorporated in treatment planning there is a misalignment between the patient and the caregiving team. This misalignment puts the patient’s outcomes at high risk for negative sequelae – falls, failure with adapt to their routines, and increasing risk of re-admission. Communicating cognitive changes or level inter-professionally can be challenging, however partnering with our nurses, doctors, and other rehabilitation professionals is the key to a patient’s success. The Cognitive Pyramid is a tool developed at Oregon Health and Sciences University through an interdisciplinary team of professional practice leaders – occupational therapists, and nursing leaders collaborating to bring evidenced based practice to care planning for patients with cognitive impairment. This tool is now in the process of being published (Journal of Nursing Care Quality March/January 2023 “Demonstrating the Value of a Standardized Cognitive Assessment Tool through the use of inter professional Rapid Safety Rounds) as a validated inter-professional cognitive assessment tool. This session will provide an outline on inter professional rounding practices and communication, the development of the Cognitive Pyramid tool, evaluation of cognitive changes in acute care and in step down settings, and strategies for addressing cognitive impairments – acute to chronic for the patient you have in front of you.

Learning Objectives:

  •  How to recognize underlying subtle cognitive changes or impairments in the hospitalized or rehabilitation patient
  • Inter profession communication strategies – connecting the dots and empowering the care team members caring for cognitively impaired patients
  • Supplementing your tools for cognitive assessment, screening, evaluation, and interventions
  • Creating clear documentation and providing treatment planning strategies for cognitively impaired patients in acute, and rehab settings

Speaker(s):

  • Sabine Kaul-Connolly, MEd, OTR/L

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Beginning
  • Practice Settings: All
  • Downloads:

Session Description:

Thousands of people across the U.S. lost a loved one to COVID-19, impacting family roles, routines, and occupations. Grief is a complex, dynamic, natural response to loss; influenced by personal, cultural, and contextual factors (AOTA, 2012; Schuurman & Mitchell, 2020). Grief can negatively present in physical or behavioral symptoms, and unresolved grief can lead to substance abuse or suicidal thoughts (AOTA, 2012). This foundational course introduces grief-informed principles and applications for occupational therapy practice (Schuurman & Mitchell, 2020). This course will prompt participants to reflect on dominant narratives, examine cultural and contextual factors influencing grief, and further investigate avenues for occupational therapy’s role in grief support (Borio & Sood, 2021). Therapeutic approaches include establishing routine and supporting meaningful occupational engagement. Participants will reflect on acquired knowledge and its applications for academic education, occupational therapy practice, and professional advocacy. References American Occupational Therapy Association. (2012). Occupational therapy’s role in mental health promotion, prevention, & intervention with children & youth: Grief and loss. https://www.aota.org/practice/clinical-topics/-/media/56f1d75ed9b54f939a3c44d765051e63.ashx Borio, J., & Sood, D. (2021). Understanding the Current Role of School-Based Occupational Therapy Practitioners in Addressing Childhood Grief and Loss and Identifying Next Steps to Expand their Current Practice. Journal of Occupational Therapy, Schools, & Early Intervention, 1-16. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19411243.2021.2003735 Schuurman, D. L., & Mitchell, M. B. (2020). Becoming grief-informed: A call to action. Dougy Center: National Grief Center for Children & Families. https://www.dougy.org/assets/uploads/Becoming-Grief-Informed_A-Call-to-Action.pdf

Learning Objectives:

  • At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to state at least two examples of how grief can impact occupational performance.
  • At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to state at least two principles of grief-informed practice.

Speaker(s):

  • Amy Kashiwa, OTD, OTR/L

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Beginning
  • Practice Settings: Pediatrics
  • Downloads:

Session Description:

“In nature, children learn to take risks, overcome fears, make new friends, regulate emotions, and create imaginary worlds.” — Angela J. Hanscom, OTR/L In this pandemic time, outdoor therapy is an amazing opportunity to connect to clients, nature, and yourself to fight the ever-increasing burnout we feel while increasing effectiveness and lowering the amount of time we spend treatment planning. Join me in learning about the What, Why, Where, and How of Nature-based OT and immediate ways to apply it to your practice area.

Learning Objectives:

  • WHAT is nature-based/outdoor occupational therapy practice
  • WHY outdoor OT can lessen treatment planning while learning intervention ideas to apply immediately, despite your setting
  • WHERE to do nature-based OT and opportunities to connect to your communities
  • HOW nature-based therapy can be applied to many practice areas, treating outside can fight burnout, and being outdoors can promote client’s independent thought, social skills, creativity, and healthy sensory/motor development thus increasing effectiveness

Speaker(s):

  • Emily Bryce, MS, OTR/L

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Beginning
  • Practice Settings: Pediatrics
  • Downloads:

Session Description:

Multidisciplinary care is not a new concept. In many settings across the lifespan, OTs work in settings with other disciplines ranging from working under the same roof to working as an integrated team. While it is widely recognized that multidisciplinary comprehensive care is hugely beneficial to the patient as well as the growth of the OT practitioner, many OTs do not receive enough education, experience, or training regarding the scopes of practice of other fields or how to integrate their practice to create truly comprehensive intervention. This course will begin with a review of the primary disciplines that work in the outpatient pediatric setting and their scopes of practice. This will be followed by discussion of the primary domains of OT that are addressed in the pediatric setting and how each domain can be assessed, treatment planned for, and intervention provided in an integrated, transdisciplinary way with other disciplines. This will be followed by strategies for practical application in multidisciplinary assessment, intervention planning, goal-setting, caregiver training, and co-treatment of the pediatric patient to maximize progress and goal-achievement in therapy.

Learning Objectives:

  • By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to recognize restrictive scripts in domestic, educational, and healthcare settings, and be able to articulate at least two negative impacts of restrictive scripts on disabled people.
  • By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to recognize the value of service-user perspectives, and list at least two models that support addressing client sexuality.
  • By the end of the presentation, participants will understand that sexual wellness is an essential aspect of comprehensive care, and explain how they will counter restrictive scripts in their practice.

Speaker(s):

  • Nichole ​​Urbanowski, M.S., OTR/L

Session Details:

Session Description:

This presentation will explore what a strengths-based approach is and when and why it is important to use versus the medical model & typically deficits based approach. We will explore different evaluation and intervention methods. A strengths-based approach is emerging as trauma-informed and supportive to utilize with autistics, gender-diverse and other at-risk youth and young adults. Visual Activity Sort is a tool that was developed in Portland, OR to support homeless and at-risk youth. It is being used in a large grant-funded study exploring community participation in young autistic adults and the OT team at Rutgers is working to make sure it is trauma-informed, culturally sensitive and representative of diverse youth. We are also engaging in content and reliability studies. At this presentation we will engage in collaborating about the importance of trauma-informed and culturally sensitive assessment and intervention strategies.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to identify and utilize a strengths-based approach to evaluation and treatment.
  • Participants will be able to identify and utilize a trauma-informed approach to evaluation and treatment.

Speaker(s):

  • Katie O’Day, MOT, OTR/L

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Beginning
  • Practice Settings: peds, schools, and therapists who work in any group setting regardless of age.
  • Downloads:

Session Description:

Learn how to co-teach/treat with your teachers and parents in an art based club format. I will discuss how I co-taught self-regulation, motor, organizational, technological and social skills through weekly club format photography lessons for the whole class targetting both individual and group goals for middle and high school students using 4-H curriculum and photo kits. This will be a hands on class. I will discuss both the theory and reasoning behind how I started doing this, and then run an actual “club session” where you get to learn a photo lesson, participate in some interactive group challenges and self-regulation activities. Then we will discuss how you may be able to use aspects of this treatment format in your practice. This will be co-taught by Professor of Yourth Studies Brian Brandt from Washington State University who is the 4-H Extension Faculty for Pierce County.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn different ways photography/art can be used as a therapy tool, though this class is specifically around school, these concepts apply to many practices. Learn strategies to bridge school lessons into the community and home. Learn fun ways to collaborate with teacher/other staff.
  • Learn ways to use experiential group games and challenges to bring all students into the group while educating staff on inclusion strategies and practicing self-regulation.
  • Learn how to check out kits from the Pierce County Extension Office (for Pierce County Residents only, but similar programs may be available in other counties). Speaker(s):

Speakers:

  • Cynthia Brandt, OTR/L
  • Brian Brandt, Professor of Youth Studies for Washington State University, Pierce County Extension

Sunday, 11:30 AM – 12:00 AM: Network with Sponsors

Sunday, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM (1 CEUs) -Business Lunch/Posters

Due to limited space for large gatherings Leg Lunch and Keynote Speaker on Saturday AND Buss Lunch and Posters on Sunday will need to present twice (for one hour each). Which one you will attend will be on your personalized schedule

Sunday, 1:00 PM – 1:15 PM -Break

Sunday, 1:15 PM – 2:15 PM (1 CEUs) -Business Lunch/Posters

Due to limited space for large gatherings Leg Lunch and Keynote Speaker on Saturday AND Buss Lunch and Posters on Sunday will need to present twice (for one hour each). Which one you will attend will be on your personalized schedule

Sunday, 2:15 PM – 2:30 PM: Break

Sunday, 2:30 PM – 4:00 PM (1.5 CEUs)

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Beginning
  • Practice Settings: Education, Fieldwork, International immersion
  • Downloads:

Session Description:

Abstract Introduction/Rationale: Preparing students to deliver OT services in the global community is an important aspect in OT education. Providing experiential activities that facilitate development of competent, culturally sensitive practitioners who can meet global initiatives in health and wellness are on the rise. Due to the increasing need for global competence, and the growing need for OT services in new contexts and settings, international fieldwork can provide a unique experience. Objectives: Many programs provide opportunities to experience different cultures, environments, and contexts through international fieldwork. The purpose of this presentation is to describe a process for preparing both host site and student for an immersive experience based on a qualitative Capstone Research Project, development of a program to prepare OT students in the US for an international fieldwork. Methods/Approach: Using an ethnographic approach, the researcher conducted a series of steps including shadowing occupational therapists during typical service delivery to clients in geriatric, pediatric, psychiatric, and rehabilitative wards at one rehabilitation facility, meeting with education and health care officials, and engaging in a cultural experience within the host country. A comprehensive needs assessment was developed with data derived from field notes. Results and Practice Implications: A manual and presentation to use with students who choose to participate in the international fieldwork in the host country will be presented as a model for preparing all stakeholders. Through the research critical components to the fieldwork experience were identified and will be shared. This information can be used to help future stakeholders to engage in such experiences and increase preparedness for international experiences. Opening doors to inclusion across the lifespan can assist with culture shock that can occur with global immersion.

Learning Objectives:

  • Preparing students to deliver OT services in the global community is an important aspect in OT education.
  • International experiences in OT education facilitate development of competent, culturally sensitive practitioners who can meet global initiatives in health and wellness.
  • Creating such experiences can be challenging, especially in the attempt to benefit all stakeholders.
  • A manual and presentation to use with students who choose to participate in the international fieldwork in the host country will be presented as a model for preparing all stakeholders.

Speaker(s):

  • Danielle DiLuzio, OTD, OTR/L

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Beginning
  • Practice Settings: All
  • Downloads:

Session Description:

Coming Soon

Learning Objectives:

Coming Soon

Speaker(s):

  • Kathryn Greene
  • Karla Gray,OTR/L, LICSW 
  • Stephanie Brubach, COTA/L 

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Intermediate
  • Practice Settings: Pediatrics
  • Downloads:

Session Description:

This presentation will encourage attendees to re-evaluate mealtime participation from the perspective, “It’s not about the food.” By learning about and applying the five components of trauma-informed care, participants will analyze common feeding problems and behavior as seen through the diagnostic framework of Pediatric Feeding Disorders (PFD). Together, we will apply these tenants to create new interventions and positive outcomes to increase clients’ relationships with food and themselves.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will re-evaluate mealtime participation from the perspective, “It’s not about the food.”
  • Participants will receive an introduction to the five components of a trauma-informed care approach
  • Participants will analyze and apply five components of TIC with PFD to create positive client relationships with food and themselves

Speaker(s):

  • Rachael Catt, OTD, OTR/L

*Part ONE is on SATURDAY

Sunday, 4:00 PM: End of Conference!