8:30 AM – 9:00 AM: Registration

9:00 AM – 12:00 PM: Morning Sessions

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Beginning
  • Practice Settings: School System,; Pediatrics; Assistive Technology
  • Downloads

Session Description:

In this hands-on session, participants will gain an overview of iOS accessibility features and then explore UDL apps to access curriculum and support reading, writing and math lessons. Participants will evaluate apps for accessibility, ease of use and educational value. After exploration of apps, participants will create a UDL lesson plan for their students using apps or features explored. There will be time for participants to share their ideas throughout the session. Please bring a laptop and/or iPad.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to identify at least three iOS accessibility features.
  • Participants will be able to evaluate at least 3 apps for accessibility, ease of use and educational value.
  • Participants will be able to incorporate at least 3 iOS features/apps into a written lesson plan that includes UDL principles.

Speaker:

Rose Racicot, MS, OTR/L is an OT and Assistive Technology Specialist in Bellevue School District and at Special Education Technology Center at CWU with 32 years of experience. She has conducted research and been published on “The Effect of Multimedia Software on Written Productivity”. She presents workshops on Assistive Technology, literacy support software, Universal Design for Learning and iPad use in education at state and national conferences as well as guest lecturing at local OT and OTA schools. She is passionate about helping educators implement Universal Design for Learning principles to create inclusive classrooms for all students to succeed.

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Beginning
  • Practice Settings: Rehabilitation; Outpatient; Adults; Chronic Illness Management; Pain Management
  • Downloads:

Session Description:

More than 100 diseases fall under the umbrella of “arthritis,” all of which have numerous symptoms outside of the defining characteristics of joint inflammation. This session will explore the many ways that the distinct value of occupational therapy can be harnessed to support persons with inflammatory forms of arthritis (with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis). We will explore strategies to address systemic symptoms outside of joint pain, including fatigue management, lifestyle modifications and coping strategies for the over one third of persons with arthritis who also have depression or anxiety.

We will explore relevant research, including speaker Cheryl Crow’s qualitative research analysis of patient conversations on rheumatoid arthritis social media groups, which showed that patients are flocking to these sites to receive peer support and guidance, particularly for managing IADLs and mental health challenges.

The speaker has rheumatoid arthritis herself and will share her personal experiences navigating the healthcare system and discovering many areas where the distinct value of occupational therapy can be harnessed to the benefit of the over 1 million adults living with rheumatoid arthritis in the US alone.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify the difference between inflammatory arthritis and osteoarthritis
  • Identify frequent non-joint symptoms of the most common inflammatory forms of arthritis (with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis)
  • Identify evidence-based strategies for occupational therapists to address the non-joint symptoms of inflammatory arthritis

Speaker:

Cheryl Crow is an adjunct faculty member at Lake Washington Institute of Technology’s Occupational Therapy Assistant program. She has conducted research on social media interactions of persons with rheumatoid arthritis, which she presented at the national American College of Rheumatology conference as well as AOTA and WOTA conferences. She also has volunteered extensively with the Arthritis Foundation and spoken at numerous national and local arthritis events, including the Juvenile Arthritis Conference, KAT-FISH Camp for Kids and Families, and the Arthritis Introspective support group.

Cheryl has written about her personal experiences as a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and has shared her “life hacks” for daily living with arthritis on numerous platforms including CreakyJoints.org, Mamas Facing Forward, Autoimmune Mom and her personal website The Enthusiastic Life.

Cheryl graduated with her masters in OT from Samuel Merritt University in 2012 and has worked in outpatient pediatrics and school-based practice in the greater Seattle area as well as China. She was selected into the AOTA’s competitive Emerging Leaders Development Program and has served as Legislative Chair for WOTA and is currently WOTA’s Membership Chair.

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Beginning
  • Practice Settings: All

Session Description:

The purpose of the re-entry educational program is to provide occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants who have not been licensed in any United States jurisdiction for a specified period of time, a method of re-entry to the practice of occupational therapy in accordance with the law and regulations. The re-entry program presentation will cover the three phases of the program, including self-assessment, study, and clinical experience. We will also discuss how an OT can volunteer to supervise and mentor an OT or OTA who is going through the re-entry process and how this can benefit you and your company.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the requirements for re-entering the field after an extended absence.
  • Learn how you can supervise and mentor a practitioner going through the re-entry process.

Speakers:

Genie Charvet, OTD, OTR/L has 28 years of experience as an OT in a variety of settings. She re-entered OT practice after taking 8 years off to homeschool her children. She recently supervised an OT going through the re-entry process. She currently works in the Kent School District and is the president of WOTA. She has presented at the WOTA, OTAC, WSLHA, ATIA and AOTA Conferences.

Kathy Weed is the Program Manager for Occupational Therapy at the Washington Department of Health. She has been in this position for five years and holds a Master’s in Public Administration. Ms. Weed works closely with the Occupational Therapy Practice Board and re-entry applicants to ensure that their proposed program provides them the skills they need to reactivate their license.

12:00 PM – 1:00 PM: Lunch

1:00 PM – 4:00 PM: Afternoon Sessions

Session Details:

Session Description:

This session introduces you to a basic form of myofascial release that is appropriate to integrate into a wide variety of practice settings. It uses a kinesiology approach to evaluating fascial restrictions and explores how applying a release can improve function. This is a lab class emphasizing the trunk, shoulder, and neck. Please bring or wear a tank top, and no lotions or creams. This class uses as the text a portion of the book by the same name.These will be available for purchase at $20.00. For more information, visit www.fixitwithyourhands.com.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe fascia and the ways fascia can cause pain and/or interfere with balanced muscle action.
  • Describe precautions for the process of myofascial release, both for the patient and for the therapist.
  • Demonstrate several fascial releases and describe how they might be used.
  • Analyze a patient’s needs and deliver a series of releases appropriate to those needs.
  • Develop a plan for continued personal learning of the myofascial release technique and a strategy for integrating the technique into the practioner’s current practice.

Speaker:

Nancy Johns has been an occupational therapist for 40 years in a variety of management and treatment settings, including 2 different pain centers and 9 years of private practice emphasizing myofascial release. She taught kinesiology in the occupational therapy program at the Univeristy of Utah for two years. Her recent book is Fix It With Your Hands; Reshaping Fascia for Pain Relief and Improved Function.

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Intermediate
  • Practice Settings: Health & Wellness; Mental Health

Session Description:

This session is an opportunity for occupational therapy practitioners to examine the possibilities for increasing accessibility of trauma-sensitive occupational therapy care. Discussion will be based on the available research from the Justice Resource Institute’s Center for Trauma & Embodiment on Trauma Center Trauma Sensitive Yoga (TCTSY), an evidence-based adjunctive clinical treatment endorsed by the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA) that effectively uses mindful movement techniques to support the healing of complex post traumatic stress symptoms. TCTSY research identifies several key principles for facilitating trauma-sensitive therapeutic relationships and environments. Occupational therapists can increase the quality and accessibility of treatment for trauma survivors when considering these key principles. This session will provide insight into each principle with specific recommendations for modifying occupational therapy treatment to increase trauma-sensitivity. Opportunities for self-care and professional development to further support one’s self in delivering authentic, trauma-sensitive occupational therapy treatment will also be identified. A TCTSY practice will be offered to further inform participants of the key principles and aspects of body-based, trauma-sensitive interventions.

Learning Objectives:

  • Examine the evidence-based research and recommendations from the Justice Resource Institute related to Trauma Center Trauma Sensitive Yoga (TCTSY) and connections to providing trauma-sensitive care
  • Identify qualities of trauma-sensitive therapy spaces including therapeutic relationships between the client, therapist, environment and system.
  • Identify necessary action steps required to support one’s self in providing trauma-sensitive occupational therapy interventions.

Speaker:

Elizabeth Sherman, MOT, OTR/L, RYT-200
She/Her/Hers

Elizabeth Sherman is a travel occupational therapist, yoga explorer, writer and creator of the blog A Travel OT & Her Dog. She is currently a candidate in the 2018-19 Trauma Center Trauma-Sensitive Yoga Facilitator (TC-TSY-F) certification program with the Justice Resource Institute’s Center for Trauma & Embodiment in Brookline, MA. She is very passionate about mental health, education and pediatrics, specifically DIR/Floortime and sensory integration therapies. She has experience practicing in early intervention, school-based settings, acute care, skilled nursing facilities, home health and specialty pediatric outpatient clinics. Her career path to-date has been intentionally-focused on awareness of individual and systemic trauma, accessing openness and authenticity in therapeutic relationships, and anti-oppressive practice development. She is invited regularly as a guest lecturer and self-advocate to speak at the graduate level on travel therapy, trauma-informed occupational therapy practice and trauma-sensitive yoga.

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Beginning
  • Practice Settings: Fieldwork and Clinical Education

Session Description:

This workshop will focus on recognizing common misunderstandings educators have with students, restructuring traditional policies and practices that often fail with the fieldwork students, and creating a climate that strikes a balance between challenge and support. Attendees will leave with strategies to increase successful approaches for reaching students with emotional, mental or behavioral challenges.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify evidence-based practice learning models to implement in the supervision and development of the fieldwork student
    Learn and practice supervisory techniques to increase student success

Speaker:

Robin Huesca earned her Bachelor of Science in Neurobiology from the University of Washington in 2003, followed by her Master of Occupational Therapy from University of Washington in 2005. While completing her Masters, Robin worked in partnership with WOTA and another student at UW, to develop and establish WOTA’s internet presence. She works as an OTA Academic Fieldwork Coordinator at Lake Washington Institute of Technology and Per Diem at the Providence Everett Regional Medical Center. Robin’s passion is working to bring Evidence-Based Research into everyday treatment practice. Now, in her role as the Academic Fieldwork Coordinator at the Lake Washington Occupational Therapy Assistant Program, she is working to help students develop both the skills to become advocates for the profession of OT and bring current, evidence-based research into their future practice.