Sunday, 7:00 AM – 7:30 AM: Registration

Sunday, 7:30 AM – 9:00 AM (1.5 CEUs)

Posters:

  • Coming Soon

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Beginning
  • Practice Settings: Pediatric focus
  • Downloads:

Session Description:

Occupational therapy training is unique, teaching us to consider the big picture question of participation while also holding in our minds the complex and nuanced moving parts of development, activity demands, and environment that intersect to influence an individual’s participation. This presentation aims to expand these ways of seeing with another lens: trauma and resilience. Case studies will be used to illustrate ways that individuals might experience trauma and how these experiences can influence health, development, and participation, with particular focus on the pediatric population. Principles of trauma-informed care and resilience-based intervention will be presented alongside opportunities to discuss ways that these principles might be integrated into practice.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to name and describe different types of trauma.
  • Participants will be able to describe at least 3 ways in which trauma might influence the development and occupational participation in children.
  • Participants will describe at least 3 principles of trauma-informed practices.
  • Participants will be able to describe at least 3 principles of resilience-based intervention.

Speaker(s):

  • Rebecca Berg, OTR/L

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Beginning
  • Practice Settings: All
  • Downloads:

Session Description:

The obligation to employ published evidence for informing our practices can be challenging to fulfill, given the limited discretionary time available to most therapists. For the past 4 years the OT education program at University of Puget Sound has paired teams of graduate students with OT practitioners who have a question of practice, but no time to thoroughly research the question. Student teams engage in a 9-month project to (1) gather, critique, and synthesize the published evidence on the topic, and then (2) assist the therapist in translating the new knowledge into practice. This workshop will describe the features and outcomes of the 45 projects completed to date, establish insights from the process, and invite attendees to consider an “Evidence Project Collaboration” in the future.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will understand the terminology of evidence appraisal and synthesis, as well as that of knowledge translation.
  • Attendees will learn the different types of practice questions amenable to an evidence search.
  • Attendees will appreciate the facilitators and barriers to implementing new knowledge based in the literature, as applied to actual OT practice settings.

Speaker(s):

  • George Tomlin, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA
  • Renee Watling, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Intermediate
  • Practice Settings: Hand Therapy
  • Downloads:

Session Description:

Traumatic finger loss is one of the most prevalent amputations in the USA, and historically the least served by prosthetic technology. Most upper-limb amputations are traumatic in origin, and 94 percent of them occur at the fingers and metacarpals. Naked Prosthetics designs and creates robust functional fingers to get users back on the job – be it as a professional musician or a construction worker. In this presentation, we will be addressing partial-hand amputation, finding a solution for this unique population, and how our prostheses are engineered for strength.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify patient demographics and etiology
  • Understand and distinguish prosthetic options available to patients
  • Gain knowledge of the Naked Prosthetics’ product family
  • Discover what reasonable functional expectations of prosthetic intervention are
  • Recognize patient candidacy and have knowledge of the pre-evaluation process

Speaker(s):

  • Charles Sauvageau, B.S., Physiology

Session Details:

Session Description:

The need for mental health occupational therapy treatment transcends the mental health setting. As occupational therapists, we can provide our patients, regardless of the setting, the benefit of mental health focused treatment that might otherwise be seen as strictly for patients in a mental health setting, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy, behavioral activation, emotional regulation, and coping skills. This course will also demonstrate the impact of mental illness of patient compliance. Additionally, we will problem solve how to advocate for your patients when mental health is at risk in an inpatient population.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the impact of mental illness on compliance with treatment and follow up appointments.
  • State at least three evidence based treatments that are typically used in a mental health venue that can be used in any treatment setting.
  • Explain how you can advocate for the mental health treatment of your inpatients even in the absence of a formal mental health diagnosis.
  • Be aware of the prevalence of mental illness in settings that do not have their main focus on mental health care.

Speaker(s):

  • Rose Evans, OTR/L MHBC

Sunday, 9:00 AM – 9:15 AM: Break

Sunday, 9:15 AM – 10:45 AM (1.5 CEUs)

Session Details:

Session Description:

The purpose of this presentation is to show therapists how they can include nature into treatment, whether that be bringing the outdoors in or taking the kids outside. The experience of being outside and with no walls allows for the ultimate sensory input. The benefits of walking on an uneven and unpredictable surface will be discussed. The auditory processing of the 3D sounds that kids experience outside allow for better position in space. The sun, wind, rain, snow, and dirt provide the ultimate tactile information. The motivation to participate increases significantly when kids are in nature. Movement occurs in all planes and directions as kids are naturally drawn to climb, dig, build, and balance. Sometimes, bringing kids outside can be difficult but nature can still be included. Having kids head outside to gather supplies, even if it’s just to a patch of grass, can increase the sensory experience and even motivation for the child to participate. Kids can bring parts of nature in or therapists can bring parts of nature into the clinic to learn from during therapy. For example, kids can go outside and gather sticks to make an art project. Therapists can bring in a pile of dirt to look at with a microscope. Grass and rocks can be gathered to create a small community for bugs. Including animals in the therapy setting provides an even more intense therapeutic experience. Animals can not speak but can display needs and emotions through non verbal language. When an animal doesn’t like something that the child is doing, they make it clear that they are not happy and will try to get away. When an animal feels safe and respected, they display this non verbally as well, teaching kids to read non verbal language. Animals do not make demands or rules and do not feel disappointment if a child doesn’t do what they want, making them a safe, nonjudgmental interaction for kids. Children are motivated to behave if they are interested in interacting with that animal.

Learning Objectives:

  • At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to understand how nature and animals can improve therapeutic goals.
  • At the conclusion of this session, participants will know how to include nature and/or animals through techniques, tips, and community resources.

Speaker(s):

  • Theresa Allender, OTR/L

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Beginning
  • Practice Settings: All
  • Downloads:

Session Description:

The purpose of the re-entry educational program is to provide occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants who have not been licensed in any United States jurisdiction for a specified period of time, a method of re-entry to the practice of occupational therapy in accordance with the law and regulations. The re-entry program presentation will cover the three phases of the program, including self-assessment, study, and clinical experience. We will also discuss how an OT can volunteer to supervise and mentor an OT or OTA who is going through the re-entry process and how this can benefit you and your company.

Learning Objectives:

  • Coming Soon

Speaker(s):

  • Kathy Weed, MPA
  • Genie Charvet, OTD, OTR/L

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Beginning
  • Practice Settings: Rehabilitation
  • Downloads: Slide Presentation

Session Description:

Do you currently work with individuals with spinal cord injury or are you interested in learning more about working with this population? In this session, participants will review concepts and special considerations when working with individuals with spinal cord injury. Our primary focus will be on upper extremity preservation and basic mobility. We will be practicing hands-on skills that you will be able to apply to your everyday practice including range of motion, positioning, and facilitation of basic movement strategies.

Learning Objectives:

  • Coming Soon

Speaker(s):

  • Sarah Bicker, MOT, OTR/L
    • Sarah Bicker received her master’s of occupational therapy from the University of Puget Sound in 2012. She has been working at Harborview Medical Center on acute care services for the past 6 years. Sarah serves as a member on the Clinical Practice Committee for Spinal Cord Injury, serial casting committee, and the assistive technology committee representing acute care. Sarah co-authored the article Essential Spinal Cord Rehabilitation in Acute Care which was published in May, 2019 and presented the poster title “Essential Spinal Cord Rehabilitation Therapy in the Intensive Care and Acute Care Settings” at the Academy of Spinal Cord Professions annual conference in 2017.
  • Tammy Shorr, OTR/L
    • Tammy Shorr received her occupational therapy degree from Boston University’s Sargent College of Allied Health in 1998. She has been working at Seattle’s Harborview Medical Center for the past 16 years and has worked on both the acute and inpatient rehabilitation services. Tammy serves as a task force member on the Clinical Practice Committee for Spinal Cord Injury at Harborview and co-authored the article Essential Spinal Cord Rehabilitation in Acute Care which was published in The Journal of Acute Care Occupational Therapy in May, 2019. Tammy has served on WOTA’s Legislative Committee, WOTA Executive Board, and now enjoys authoring the WOTA StoryCorps column for the WOTA newsletter.

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Beginning
  • Practice Settings: Community and disability management
  • Downloads: Slide Presentation

Session Description:

Hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, and floods are major temporal and environmental events that adversely impact people during and after disaster. Unique problems arise for people with disability in these situations. Community checklists provide general disaster preparedness guidelines that may not address special needs. Attendees will review suggestions for disaster preparation for most persons, community assistance, and what Occupational Therapists and students have contributed in the wake of major events.

Learning Objectives:

  • Coming Soon

Speaker(s):

  • Susan Powell, OTD, OTR/L, ATP, CBIS

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Intermediate
  • Practice Settings: Pediatrics
  • Downloads: Resource List

Session Description:

This course will provide education to school-based and community based occupational therapy practitioners on their role during secondary transition planning and services. Despite the potential benefit of including occupational therapy services for adolescents and young adults, practice with this population has historically been limited. Research indicates that only 7.5% of transition age students receive occupational therapy in schools during this critical life event. This course will also cover materials to ensure OTPs understand how increased occupational therapy services will improve client outcomes for this population as they transition to participation in adult occupations.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe why increased occupational therapy participation in postsecondary transition planning and services will improve client outcomes.
  • Understand how to improve outcomes for adolescents with disabilities through increased OT participation.
  • Inform OTPs, administrators, and other stakeholders about the distinct value of occupational therapy in postsecondary transition planning.
  • Effectively communicate 10 declarations in order to influence or advocate for OT’s role in transition planning and services

Speaker(s):

  • Katie Gedrimas, OTR/L
  • Barbara Abbott, OTD, OTR/L

Sunday, 10:45 AM – 11:00 AM: Break

Sunday, 11:00 AM – 12:30 PM: Business Lunch (1.5 CEUs)

Sunday, 12:30 PM – 12:45 PM: Break

Sunday, 12:45 PM – 2:15 PM (1.5 CEUs)

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Beginning
  • Practice Settings: Pediatrics, early intervention birth to three
  • Downloads:

Session Description:

Have you ever wondered, “Is birth to three for me?” Learn more about Early Intervention as a practice setting as well as the key areas that OTs can make a difference in the lives of infants, toddlers and their families.

Learning Objectives:

  • After this course, participants will be able to identify the 5 guiding principles for Early Intervention.
  • After this course, participants will be able to identify the 5 steps in the IFSP process.
  • After this course, participants will be able to identify the primary occupations and outcomes for infants and toddlers.
  • After this course, participants will be able to describe the role of OT in EI.
  • After this course, participants will be able to summarize the key infant motor milestones.
  • After this course, participants will be able to summarize the influence of sensory processing in the occupations of infants/toddlers.

Speaker(s):

  • Jessica McMurdie, OTR/L

Session Details:

Session Description:

Brief presentation by fieldwork coordinators from the University of Puget Sound and Green River College followed by a panel discussion with experience fieldwork educators.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be understand the differences between level I and level II fieldwork
  • Participants will understand basic responsibilities of a fieldwork educator
  • Participants will be able to utilize strategies to facilitate student learning during fieldwork
  • Participants will be equipped to contribute to the future of the profession by mentoring a fieldwork student

Speaker(s):

  • Melissa Porras-Monroe, OTR/L
  • Dawn Yoshimura-Smith, OTR/L

Session Details:

Session Description:

Living in the 21st century has us adapting to our constantly evolving world. As occupational therapists we teach others how to adapt and modify to be successful in their life’s occupations. And now it is our turn. Telehealth service delivery has the potential to expand our services and meet more student needs. According to the AOTA Telehealth Position Paper, “It is the position of AOTA that occupational therapy services provided through telehealth should be valued, recognized, and reimbursed the same as occupational therapy services provided in person (AOTA, 2018, p.6). ” This course is designed to introduce practicing occupational therapists to the benefits of telehealth while pointing out and mitigating the barriers to online school-based interventions, evaluations, and collaboration. In addition to providing information and opportunity for questions and discussion, the participants will work within small groups to adapt a typical onsite therapy activity to an online application.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the benefits and limitations of telehealth and why it is being used by school-based therapists.
  • Identify technology needs and methods used for providing school-based direct intervention, classroom observation, evaluation, and consultation services through a telehealth delivery model .
  • Participate in a small group activity to adapt a typical onsite activity to an online application.”

Speaker(s):

  • Rachel Morris, OTR/L

    • Rachel Morris is a graduate of Eastern Michigan University and has 28 years of professional experience as an occupational therapist. She has worked in several settings including inpatient/outpatient trauma-neuro rehabilitation centers, hand therapy clinics, early childhood education and K-12 schools. Rachel obtained an Autism Certificate from the University of Colorado at Denver in 2008 and is currently pursuing a masters in industrial and organizational psychology through Touro University Worldwide. Working in the forefront of OT telehealth services, Rachel started providing online school-based services in 2014 and currently works as a Clinical Quality Manager for PresenceLearning.

Session Details:

  • Content Level: Intermediate
  • Practice Settings: Rehabilitation
  • Downloads:

Session Description:

Rehabilitation; hand therapy & orthotics, foot & ankle therapy, pediatrics & oral motor, post mastectomy, general wellness and management of a private practice

Learning Objectives:

  • Why is it important to have several skill sets in your tool basket?
  • What is one of the best ways to navigate yoursef through a new specialty area?
  • What is the best professional fit for you and your personal self?
  • What are the precautions a clinician must take when having several skill sets?
  • Name some baseline skills for being an effective Clinical Manager

Speaker(s):

  • Karen Witters, OTR/L
    • Karen Allen Witters, OTR/L is a 1983 University of Puget Sound graduate. She is the owner of Pioneer Therapy Center, a full service occupational therapy rehabilitation clinic in Puyallup. Karen has worked in a wide variety of settings including schools, in/outpatient, SNF’s and home based. Although Karen finds all aspects of OT interesting, her main focus has been on treating the upper extremity and hand, custom orthotics, pediatrics, post mastectomy and the administration & management of many of the clinics that she has worked at. Recently, studying and treating infants post tongue tie release has gotten her professional attention. She has also recently been a clinical instructor to physician assists on three medical missions to the Nicaragua and Dominican Republic. Throughout her career Karen has created a welcome venue for OT students to learn various techniques and treatment strategies for their own future tool box. She and her husband have three sons, which one works as a COTA/L with her at
      PTC and one grandson who all live nearby for many family activities and adventures.
  • Jessica Sides, COTA/L
    • Jessica Sides is a COTA/L and the Clinic Manager at Pioneer Therapy Center. Jessica specializes in program development for lower extremity function, fall prevention, general conditioning and wellness. A strong believer in a holistic approach to full function, Jessica regularly develops wellness campaigns to assist both clients and staff with effective strategies to promote optimal physical, social, and mental health.

Session Details:

Session Description:

Despite every profession setting the expectation of respect and collaboration for the good of the patient, disagreements and Interprofessional conflict are common across treatment settings. This session will explore whether these episodes are a necessity to grow through, a nuisance to be endured or a nightmare from which to escape. Participant engagement is encouraged. Strategies applicable to both general and specific situations will be presented.

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify common points and functions of professional conflict
  • Develop strategies that facilitate perspective/conversational shifts

Speaker(s):

  • Karla Gray, OTR/L, LICSW

Sunday, 2:15 PM – 2:30 PM: Break

Sunday, 2:30 PM – 4:00 PM (1.5 CEUs)

Session Description:

What is a Community of Practice?

“Groups of people who share a concern, a set of problems, or a passion about a topic, and who deepen their knowledge and expertise in this area by interacting on an ongoing basis.” (Wenger, McDermott, & Snyder, 2002, p. 4) Wenger, E., McDermott, R., & Snyder, W. M. (2002). Cultivating communities of practice: A guide to managing knowledge. Boston: Harvard Business School Press

WOTA is in the process of forming Communities of Practice in the areas of:

  • Pediatrics (includes inpatient, outpatient, and school-based)

Please join this meeting to find out more. The meetings will be facilitated and will provide an opportunity to give your input on the format, scheduling and topic of future meetings, discuss current issues for your practice area, and network with other OT’s and OTA’s in Washington.

Session Description:

What is a Community of Practice?

“Groups of people who share a concern, a set of problems, or a passion about a topic, and who deepen their knowledge and expertise in this area by interacting on an ongoing basis.” (Wenger, McDermott, & Snyder, 2002, p. 4) Wenger, E., McDermott, R., & Snyder, W. M. (2002). Cultivating communities of practice: A guide to managing knowledge. Boston: Harvard Business School Press

WOTA is in the process of forming Communities of Practice in the areas of:

  • Rehabilitation (includes inpatient, outpatient, skilled nursing, home health and day care)

Please join this meeting to find out more. The meetings will be facilitated and will provide an opportunity to give your input on the format, scheduling and topic of future meetings, discuss current issues for your practice area, and network with other OT’s and OTA’s in Washington.

Session Description:

What is a Community of Practice?

“Groups of people who share a concern, a set of problems, or a passion about a topic, and who deepen their knowledge and expertise in this area by interacting on an ongoing basis.” (Wenger, McDermott, & Snyder, 2002, p. 4) Wenger, E., McDermott, R., & Snyder, W. M. (2002). Cultivating communities of practice: A guide to managing knowledge. Boston: Harvard Business School Press

WOTA is in the process of forming Communities of Practice in the areas of:

  • Hands/Industrial (includes hand therapy and industrial rehab)

Please join this meeting to find out more. The meetings will be facilitated and will provide an opportunity to give your input on the format, scheduling and topic of future meetings, discuss current issues for your practice area, and network with other OT’s and OTA’s in Washington.

Session Description:

What is a Community of Practice?

“Groups of people who share a concern, a set of problems, or a passion about a topic, and who deepen their knowledge and expertise in this area by interacting on an ongoing basis.” (Wenger, McDermott, & Snyder, 2002, p. 4) Wenger, E., McDermott, R., & Snyder, W. M. (2002). Cultivating communities of practice: A guide to managing knowledge. Boston: Harvard Business School Press

WOTA is in the process of forming Communities of Practice in the areas of:

  • Mental Health (includes inpatient and outpatient)

Please join this meeting to find out more. The meetings will be facilitated and will provide an opportunity to give your input on the format, scheduling and topic of future meetings, discuss current issues for your practice area, and network with other OT’s and OTA’s in Washington.

Session Description:

What is a Community of Practice?

“Groups of people who share a concern, a set of problems, or a passion about a topic, and who deepen their knowledge and expertise in this area by interacting on an ongoing basis.” (Wenger, McDermott, & Snyder, 2002, p. 4) Wenger, E., McDermott, R., & Snyder, W. M. (2002). Cultivating communities of practice: A guide to managing knowledge. Boston: Harvard Business School Press

WOTA is in the process of forming Communities of Practice in the areas of:

  • Secondary Transition

Please join this meeting to find out more. The meetings will be facilitated and will provide an opportunity to give your input on the format, scheduling and topic of future meetings, discuss current issues for your practice area, and network with other OT’s and OTA’s in Washington.